Saturday, August 15, 2009

The Lioness Rampant by Tamora Pierce [50BPT]


Today's entry in 50 Books for Problematic Times comes from an anonymous source. Thanks!

The Lioness Rampant, by Tamora Pierce


Published in 1983, the books include a girl who disguises herself as a man to do the job she wants, safe sex and birth control, and race issues. She also dealt with other prejudices in publishing at the time: female writers with female protagonists were writing "young girl books", her book had to be split into a series because it was too long for young readers, and fantasy and magic are for boys so why write a story with a main female protagonist. Her books have been found on banned lists (http://www.ci.springfield.or.us/Library/Bibliographies/YA/YAChallenged.pdf). Also, she is a prolific feminist who keeps a great blog that encourages young adult literature for teens of both genders and other issues that are dear to her heart.
--
50 Books for Problematic Times is still accepting submissions!

6 comments:

  1. Holy carp, Tamora Pierce! I was in love with these books when I was in middle school. I'm also glad to see some fantasy on the list.

    ReplyDelete
  2. >>Also, she is a prolific feminist who keeps a great blog that encourages young adult literature for teens of both genders and other issues that are dear to her heart.

    I know you know this, but I wanted to point out that there are more than two genders.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The entire "Song of the Lioness" series is wonderful, and i also remember loving these books as a young moody teenager. Her series about Diane, a woman that has magic that allows her to communicate with animals, is great too. Her influences are much more diverse than just medival fantasy fare.

    If any fantasy series should be made into movies, tis these.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for pointing that out, Wallflower - you're 100% right. Wish I'd pointed that out to the writer.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I loved Tamora Pierce as a kid. Everyone in my class read her books in about 5th grade, and I've reread them several times since. At the time I didn't realize how progressive they really were -- in 5th grade it was more like oooooh, sex! -- but in retrospect they were really quite revolutionary, particularly for books that aimed so young.

    ReplyDelete
  6. @ Wallflower

    On that note, her most recent book (the Beka Cooper series) had a transgendered character. And the Circle of Magic books have a main character who is a lesbian.

    ReplyDelete

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.

Blog Widget by LinkWithin